ДИДАКТИЧНІ МАТЕРІАЛИ ДО СПЕЦКУРСУ «КРАЇНОЗНАВСТВО ВЕЛИКОБРИТАНІЇ» II семестр. ПЛАНИ-КОНСПЕКТИ УРОКІВ - 2016 рік

LESSON 29 Practical training "British National Cuisine"

Aims and objectives:

- to introduce and practice the vocabulary;

- to develop interactive skills based on the country study;

- to widen the students' outlook.

PROCEDURE

I. INTRODUCTION

Greeting

T. Good morning, students! I’m glad to see you today! Today we are going to work on the topic “British National Cuisine”.

Warm up

Task 1. Answer the questions.

1. What do you know about British national cuisine?

2. What the most famous British dishes can you name?

3. What food do the British people like?

II. THE MAIN PART

Task 2. Match the phrases.

1) the spices of the east

a) національна кулінарна гордість

2) English cakes and pastries

b) різноманітні та цікаві інгредієнти

3) the arrival of cane sugars

с) кулінарний жарт

4) a gastronomic joke

d) прибуття тростини

5) many diverse and interesting ingredients

е) англійські торти та пиріжки

6) the national culinary pride

f) східні спеції

Task 3. Read the text and put the verbs in brackets in the right form.

BRITISH CUISINE

British cuisine has always been multicultural, a pot pourri of eclectic styles. In ancient times it ... (to influence) by the Romans and in medieval times the French. When the Frankish Normans ... (to invade), they ... (to bring) with them the spices of the east: cinnamon, saffron, nutmeg, pepper, ginger. Sugar came to England at that time, and was considered a spice — rare and expensive. Before the arrival of cane sugars, honey and fruit juices were the only sweeteners.

During Victorian times good old British stodge ... (to mix) with exotic spices from all over the Empire. And today despite being part of Europe we ... (to keep) up our links with the countries of the former British Empire, now united under the Commonwealth.

Among English cakes and pastries, many ... (to tie) to the various religious holidays of the year. Hot Cross Buns ... (to eat) on Good Friday, Plum Pudding for Christmas, and Twelfth Night Cake for Epiphany.

Unfortunately a great deal of damage ... (to do) to British cuisine during the two world wars. Britain is an island and supplies of many goods became short. The war effort ... ( to use) up goods and services and so less were left over for private people to consume. Ships importing food stuffs had ... (to travel) in convoys and so they could make fewer journeys. During the second world war food rationing ... (to begin) in January 1940 and ... (to lift) only gradually after the war.

The British tradition of stews, pies and breads, according to the taste buds of the rest of the world, ... (to go) into terminal decline. What was best in England was only that which ... (to show) the influence of France, and so English food let itself become a gastronomic joke and the French art of Nouvell Cuisine was adopted.

In the late 1980’s, British cuisine ... (to start) to look for a new direction. Disenchanted with the overblown Nouvelle Cuisine, chefs ... (to begin) to look a little closer to home for inspiration. Calling on a rich (and largely ignored) tradition, and utilizing many diverse and interesting ingredients, the basis ... (to form) for what is now known as modern British food. Game ... (to enjoy) a resurgence in popularity although it always had a central role in the British diet, which reflects both the abundant richness of the forests and streams and an old aristocratic prejudice against butchered meats.

In London especially, one can not only experiment with the best of British, but the best of the world as there are many distinct ethnic cuisines to sample, Chinese, Indian, Italian and Greek restaurants are amongst the most popular.

Although some traditional dishes such as roast beef and Yorkshire pudding, Cornish pasties, steak and kidney pie, bread and butter pudding, or fish and chips, remain popular, there has been a significant shift in eating habits in Britain. Rice and pasta ... (to account) for the decrease in potato consumption and the consumption of meat has also fallen. Vegetable and salad oils largely ... (to replace) the use of butter.

Roast beef is still the national culinary pride. It ... (to call) a “joint”, and ... (to serve) at midday on Sunday with roasted potatoes, Yorkshire pudding, two vegetables, a good strong horseradish, gravy, and mustard.

Today there is more emphasis on fine, fresh ingredients in the better restaurants and markets in the UK offer food items from all over the world. Salmon, exotic fruit, Norwegian prawns and New Zealand lamb are choice items. Wild fowl and game are other specialties on offer.

In fact fish is central to the English diet, we are after all an island surrounded by some of the richest fishing areas of the world. Many species ... (to swim) in the cold offshore waters: hake, plaice, cod (the most popular choice for fish and chips), turbot, halibut, mullet and John Dory. Oily fishes also abound (mackerel, pilchards, and herring) as do crustaceans ... (to like) lobster and oysters. Eel, also common, ... (to cook) into a wonderful pie with lemon, parsley, and shallots, all topped with puff pastry.

Task 4. Complete the sentences.

1. British cuisine has always been ... , a pot pourri of eclectic styles.

2. Among English cakes and pastries, many are tied to the various ... of the year.

3. In the late 1980’s chefs began to look a little closer to home for ... .

4. Roast beef is still the national ... .

5. In fact ... is central to the English diet.

Task 5. Say if these sentences are true or false.

1. In ancient times it was influenced by the German and in medieval times by the French.

2. Before the arrival of cane sugars, honey and fruit juices were the only sweeteners.

3. In the late 1980’s, British cuisine started to look for a new direction.

4. Roast beef is served at midday on Saturday.

5. There are many distinct ethnic cuisines to sample, Chinese, Indian, Italian and Greek restaurants are amongst the

Task 6. Choose the correct answer.

1. When the Frankish Normans invaded Britain, they brought with them the spices of ... .

a) the west;

b) the east;

c) the north.

2. During Victorian times good old British stodge mixed with exotic spices from . .

a) all over the Empire;

b) all over the world;

c) all over th continent.

3. Among English ... , many were tied to the various religious holidays of the year.

a) fruits and vegetables;

b) meat and fish;

c) cakes and pastries.

4. In the late ... , British cuisine started to look for a new direction.

a) 1960s;

b) 1980s;

c) 1970s.

5. In fact ... is central to the English diet.

a) fish;

b) meat;

c) vegetables.

III. SUMMING UP

Speaking

Task 7. Answer the questions.

1. What can you say from the history of British cuisine?

2. What can you say about British diet?

3. Name the national and traditional British dishes.

Home assignment

Describe the national and traditional British dishes.

Additional material to the topic "British National Cuisine"

Task 8. Read and complete the text with the words from the box.

Overcooked; fish; ingredients; criticize; reasonable; disappointing; difficult

Some people ... English food. They say it’s unimaginable, boring, tasteless, it’s chips with everything and totally ... vegetables.

The basic ... , when fresh, are so full of flavour that British haven’t had to invent sauces to disguise their natural taste. What can compare with fresh pees or new potatoes just boiled and served with butter? Why drown spring lamb in wine or cream and spices, when with just one or two herbs it is absolutely delicious?

If you ask foreigners to name some typically English dishes, they will probably say “... and chips” then stop. It is ... , but true that, there is no tradition in England of eating in restaurants, because the food doesn’t lend itself to such preparation. English cooking is found at home. So it is ... to find a good English restaurant with a ... prices.

In most cities in Britain you’ll find Indian, Chinese, French and Italian restaurants. In London you’ll also find Indonesian, Mexican, Greek ... Cynics will say that this is because English have no “cuisine” themselves, but this is not quite the true.

Task 9. Answer the questions.

1. What do foreigners say when they criticize English food?

2. Do English people use a lot of sauces?

3. From a foreigner’s point of view, what are typically English dishes?

4. Do all English eat in restaurants?

5. What kind of restaurants can you find in Britain?

6. Is it the true that English have no cuisine?





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