ДИДАКТИЧНІ МАТЕРІАЛИ ДО СПЕЦКУРСУ «КРАЇНОЗНАВСТВО ВЕЛИКОБРИТАНІЇ» II семестр. ПЛАНИ-КОНСПЕКТИ УРОКІВ - 2016 рік

LESSON 21 Practical training "British Painting"

Aims and objectives:

- to introduce and practice vocabulary, grammar;

- to develop skills in reading and speaking;

- to expand students' knowledge about British painters.

PROCEDURE

I. INTRODUCTION

Warm up

Task 1. Answer the questions.

1. Is it easy to draw or to paint?

2. How do people become painters?

3. What qualities must a painter possess to become a real artist?

4. What kind of pictures do you prefer: landscapes (seascapes) portraits or still-life pieces?

5. What English artists do you know? What are they famous for?

II. THE MAIN PART

Task 2. Read the text.

ENGLISH PAINTERS

The early period of painting in England was represented mostly by foreign artists. In the 16th century Hans Holbein the Younger, a well-known painter, was invited to London by the King Henry VIII. He played an important part in the development of English portrait art.

Later a new foreigner, Van Dyck, founded a school of portrait painting. In 1641 another painter Peter Lely came from Holland. He became celebrated for portraits of higher classes.

The 18th century was the century during which a truly national painting school was created in England. Portrait art at that time was the main kind of painting. It depended upon the conditions under which the English painting school developed.

Hogarth William (1697-1764), was the leading English satirical painter of the 1700’s who raised British painting to a level of importance. He was also a noted engraver and art critic. Hogarth became best known for paintings and engravings that humorously commented on manners and morals of his time.

Hogarth created several series of paintings that told a story through a number of related scenes. These series include the eight paintings that make up A Rake’s Progress (early 1730’s) and six paintings in Marriage a la Mode (1743).

Hogarth painted many realistic, often unflattering, portraits that reflected the artist’s strong sense of color and his powers of observation.

Hogarth was a controversial and outspoken art critic whose opinions angered many of his fellow artists. He wrote one book, The Analysis of Beauty (1753), which combined practical advice on painting with his own theories of art.

Sir Joshua Reynolds (1723-1792) was a great English portrait painter. Reynolds’ portraits show his skill in capturing the likeness of his subjects, as well as his keen understanding of human nature. Among Reynolds’ masterpieces are the portraits Hon. Augustus Keppel (1754), William Robertsen (1772), and Sarah Siddons as the Tragic Muse (1784). Reynolds wrote 15 essays on art education called Discourses that stressed the importance of grandeur in art and rigid academic training.

Reynolds became the most fashionable painter of his time. He helped found the Royal Academy of Arts in 1768 and became its first president. In 1784, he was appointed painter to the king.

Thomas Gainsborough (1727-1788) was one of the greatest British painters. He is famous for his portraits, but he also painted many landscapes. Gainsborough further developed the conversation piece, a type of painting that consisted of a group of individuals in a landscape or an interior setting.

Gainsborough helped found the Royal Academy of Arts. He painted portraits of King George III and the royal family. He also painted portraits of leading aristocrats, politicians, writers, and actors of the day.

Gainsborough’s early portraits are detailed in style. His later ones are less detailed and more sketchy. Gainsborough’s most famous work is The Blue Boy, an elegant portrait completed in 1770. It shows artist’s preference for cool blue and green colors, in contrast to the reds, yellows, and browns of his rival portrait painters, Sir Joshua Reynolds and George Romney. At the end of his life, Gainsborough returned to his first love, landscape painting.

The English artist John Constable also explored the new freedom of self-expression through landscape painting. Constable felt a deep love for the landscape and lifestyle of Suffolk in Eastern England, where he grew up. To express this strong attachment, he portrayed a quiet, lush, and beautiful Suffolk landscape. There everyone, including children and laborers, lived in harmony with the bountiful land and with God. Constable expressed many of these ideals in BoatBuilding near Flatford Mill. The rough brushstrokes and broken color capture a feeling of air, light, and wind. Constable’s approach to painting created a sense of real living nature that influenced romantic painters in France, particularly Camille Corot and the Barbizon School.

Task 3. Match.

1. Hogarth William

a) was an influential 18th century English painter, specialising in portraits and promoting the “Grand Style” in painting which depended on idealisation of the imperfect. He was one of the founders and first President of the Royal Academy. George III appreciated his merits and knighted him in 1769

2. Sir Joshua Reynolds

b) was an English Romantic painter. Born in Suffolk, he is known principally for his landscape paintings of Dedham Vale, the area surrounding his home which he invested with an intensity of affection. His paintings are now among the most popular and valuable in British art, he was never financially successful and did not become a member of the establishment until he was elected to the Royal Academy at the age of 52. He sold more paintings in France than in his native England

3. Thomas Gainsborough

c) was an English portrait and landscape painter. He was noted for the speed with which he applied his paint, and he worked more from his observations of nature (and of human nature) than from any application of formal academic rules

4. John Constable

d) was an English painter, printmaker, pictorial satirist, social critic and editorial cartoonist who has been credited with pioneering western sequential art. His work ranged from realistic portraiture to comic strip-like series of pictures called “modern moral subjects”. Knowledge of his work is so pervasive that satirical political illustrations in this style are often referred to as “Hogarthian”

Task 4. Translate the following word combinations from English into Ukrainian. Use these word combinations to make up your sentences.

• a level of importance;

• comment on manners and morals;

• a controversial and outspoken art critic;

• the importance of grandeur;

the conversation piece;

detailed in style;

• rival portrait painters;

• explore the new freedom of self-expression;

• the rough brushstrokes and broken color;

• a sense of real living nature.

Task 5. Agree or disagree. Expound the point of view given in the statement or prove that it is false.

1. The early period of painting in England was represented mostly by Thomas Gainsborough and John Constable.

2. Sir Joshua Reynolds founded a school of portrait painting.

3. William Hogarth was an English painter, printmaker, pictorial satirist, social critic and editorial cartoonist.

4. Hogarth became best known for The Analysis of Beauty (1753), which combined practical advice on painting with his own theories of art.

5. Sir Joshua Reynolds was a great English landscape painter.

6. Sir Joshua Reynolds was one of the founders and first President of the Royal Academy.

7. The portraits of Thomas Gainsborough were influenced by the paintings of Sir Joshua Reynolds.

8. Thomas Gainsborough worked more from his observations of nature than from any application of formal academic rules.

9. Constable’s approach to painting influenced romantic painters in England.

10. Constable painted portraits of leading aristocrats, politicians, writers, and actors of the day.

Task 6. Summarize the text in 5 paragraphs specifying the contribution painters made to the English arts.

Task 7. Answer the questions.

1. What service do you think the artist performs for mankind?

2. Historically there have been various reasons for the making of pictures, apart from the artist’s desire to create a work of visual beauty. Can you point out some of them?

3. How does pictorial art serve as a valuable historical record? What can it preserve for the posterity?

4. Why are great artists often recognized only after their death?

5. What kind of painting do you prefer? Why?

Task 8. Group discussion.

1. Is the appreciation of pictures a special faculty which only a few can possess?

2. A great painting enriches our experience of life, just as a great poem does or a great musical composition.

3. “Aesthetic effects” make art especially engaging and illuminating.

III. SUMMING UP

Speaking

Task 9. Answer the questions.

1. What is the role of arts?

2. What British painters do you know?

Home assignment

Select a reproduction of a portrait painting and discuss it according to the following outline:

1. The general effect.

2. The contents of the picture.

3. The composition and coloring.

4. Interpretation and evaluation.

Additional material to the topic "British Painting"

Jigsaw reading

Task 10. Ask questions and complete the text.

BRITISH PAINTING

Group I

During What centuries?, young members of the British upper classes extended their education with the Grand Tour of continental Europe. There they were introduced to a What? that influenced their tastes as adult art patrons. To ensure such high standards in the visual arts, What? opened in London in 1769; until the 1800s virtually every major artist in Britain was elected a member or, at least, submitted work for its annual exhibitions.

What? is intimately linked with the broader traditions of European painting. Kings and queens commissioned What? from German, Dutch, and Flemish artists. Who? imparted an aura of perfection even to the most insipid of their sitters. British painters found What? from their journeys abroad, in Italy especially.

Beginning When?, English artists began to develop their own styles in marine and allegorical painting. In Whose? satirical and moralizing scenes of contemporary life one senses the evolution of a new and inherently British idiom. Emphatically propounding the Englishness of his art, Who? promoted an academy for the arts, the predecessor of the Royal Academy of Arts. The latter was founded by Whom?, whose influential Discourses stressed the preeminence of history painting. Ironically, perhaps the key figure in the development of English history painting was Who?, who became the second president of the Royal Academy after Reynolds’ death. Other American painters, such as John Singleton Copley, followed Whose? example and relocated to London. Who? became one of the most celebrated artists of the day and painter to the king.

What century? saw a growing interest in landscape painting. Some artists, such as Richard Wilson, painted What?, while others, such as Joseph Wright of Derby, pursued more individual and personal visions of the natural world. Who?, although known best for his fashionable portraits, painted highly imaginative landscapes and seascapes that relate to no specific time or place.

The great flowering of English landscape painting came When?, primarily in the works of two masters, John Constable and J. M. W. Turner. Whose? true-to-life views of the English countryside expressed romantic ideals about the essential harmony and purity of nature. Who?, on the other hand, was a romantic who sought to project the way in which sun, fire, smoke, wind, and water affected and transformed the physical world. With What?, Constable and Turner profoundly influenced the work not only of many subsequent British painters, but of countless American and European artists as well.

Group II

During the 18th and 19th centuries, Who? extended their education with the Grand Tour of continental Europe. There they were introduced to a sophisticated level of artistic achievement that influenced What? To ensure such high standards in the visual arts, the Royal Academy opened in London When?; until the 1800s virtually every major artist in Britain was elected a member or, at least, submitted work for its annual exhibitions.

The history of British painting is intimately linked with What?. Kings and queens commissioned portraits from What artists?. Holbein, Van Dyck, and other eminent foreign portraitists imparted

What? even to the most insipid of their sitters. British painters found inspiration and guidance from their journeys abroad, Where? especially.

Beginning in the early eighteenth century, English artists began to develop What? In William Hogarth’s satirical and moralizing scenes of contemporary life one senses the evolution of What? Emphatically propounding the Englishness of his art, Hogarth promoted an academy for the arts, the predecessor of What?. The latter was founded by Sir Joshua Reynolds, whose influential Discourses stressed What? Ironically, perhaps the key figure in the development of English history painting was the American-born Benjamin West, who became the second president of the Royal Academy after What? Other American painters, such as John Singleton Copley, followed West’s example and relocated Where? Copley became one of the most celebrated artists of the day and What painter?

The late eighteenth century saw What? Some artists, such as Richard Wilson, painted idealized scenes imbued with the spirit of the classical past, while others, such as Joseph Wright of Derby, pursued What? Thomas Gainsborough, although known best for What? painted highly imaginative landscapes and seascapes that relate to no specific time or place.

The great flowering of English landscape painting came during the first half of the nineteenth century, primarily in the works of two masters, What masters? Constable’s true-to-life views of the English countryside expressed romantic ideals about What? Turner, on the other hand, was a romantic who sought to project What way? With their fresh vision and powerfully original styles, Constable and Turner profoundly influenced Whose work?

Task 11. Match.

1. William Hogarth

a) painted idealized scenes imbued with the spirit of the classical past

2. Sir Joshua Reynolds

b) painted highly imaginative landscapes and seascapes that relate to no specific time or place

3. Benjamin West

c) was a painter whose true-to-life views of the English countryside expressed romantic ideals about the essential harmony and purity of nature

4. John Singleton Copley

d) founded the Royal Academy of Arts

5. Richard Wilson

e) pursued more individual and personal visions of the natural world

6. Joseph Wright of Derby

f) was the second president of the Royal Academy

7. Thomas Gainsborough

g) was an American painter who relocated to London and became one of the most celebrated artists of the day and painter to the king

8. John Constable

h) promoted an academy for the arts

9. J. M. W. Turner

i) sought to project the way in which sun, fire, smoke, wind, and water affected and transformed the physical world





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