ДИДАКТИЧНІ МАТЕРІАЛИ ДО СПЕЦКУРСУ «КРАЇНОЗНАВСТВО ВЕЛИКОБРИТАНІЇ» II семестр. ПЛАНИ-КОНСПЕКТИ УРОКІВ - 2016 рік

LESSONS 23-24 Lecture and practical training "Educational System of Great Britain"

Aims and objectives:

- to practice students' habits of getting additional information from the text;

- to develop students' speaking, writing and grammar skills;

- to expand the vocabulary related to the topic.

PROCEDURE

I. INTRODUCTION

Greeting

T. Good morning, students! I’m glad to see you today! Today we are going to work on the topic “Educational System of Great Britain”.

Warm up

Task 1. Answer the questions.

1. What do you like and dislike in the system of education of our country?

2. Do you think there should be private and state schools? Why? Give your reasons!

3. The system of education in Great Britain is considered to be one of the most successful in the world. Do you agree with this?

II. THE MAIN PART

Reading and grammar

Task 2. Read the text and complete the sentences.

TYPES OF SCHOOLS

All British children must stay at school from the age of 5 until they are 16. Many of them stay longer and take final examination when they are 17 or 18. Before 1965 all children had to go through special intelligence tests. There were different types of state secondary schools and at the age of 11 children went to different schools in accordance of with the results of the tests.

State schools are divided into the following types:

Grammar schools. Children who go to grammar schools are usually those who show preference for academic subjects, although many grammar schools now also have some technical courses.

Technical schools. Some children go to technical schools. Most courses there are either commercial or technical.

Modern schools. Boys and girls who are interested in working with there hands and learning in a practical way can go to a technical schools and learn some trade.

Comprehensive schools. These schools usually combine all types of secondary education. They have physics, chemistry, biology laboratories, machine workshops for metal and woodwork and also geography, history and art departments, commercial and domestic courses.

There are also many schools which the State doesn’t control. They are private schools. They charge fees for educating children and many of them are boarding schools, at which pupils live during the term time.

After leaving school many young people go to colleges or further education. Those who become students at Colleges of Technology (called “Techs”) come from different schools at different ages between 15 and 17. The lectures at such colleges, each an hour long, start at 8,15 and end at 4,45 in the afternoon.

1. Before 1965 all children had to go through ... .

2. Comprehensive schools usually combine ... .

3. ... charge fees for educating children and many of them are boarding schools, at which pupils live during the term time.

4. After leaving school many young people ... .

5. The lectures at colleges, each an hour long, start at ... and end at ... in the afternoon.

Task 3. Put the verbs in brackets into the right form.

BRITISH SCHOOLS

Schooling is voluntary under the age of 5 but there is some free nursery school education before that age. Primary education ... (to take) place in infant schools for pupils ages from 5 to 7 years old and junior schools (from 8 to 11 years). Some areas ... (to have) different systems in which middle schools replace junior schools and take pupils ages from 9 to 11 years.

Secondary education ... (to have) been available in Britain since 1944. It is compulsory up to the age of 16, and pupils can stay at school voluntarily up to three years longer. In 1965 non-selective comprehensive schools ... (to introduce). Most local education authorities have now completely changed over to comprehensive schooling.

At the age of 16 pupils ... (to take) school-leaving examinations in several subjects at the Ordinary level. The exam used to be conducted by eight independent examining boards, most of them ... (to connect) with the university. This examination could also be taken by candidates at a further education establishment. This exam ... (to call) the General Certificate of Education (GCE). Pupils of comprehensive school ... (to take) the examination called the Certificate of Secondary Education either with or instead of the GCE.

A GCE of Advanced (“A”) level ... (to take) two years after the Ordinary level exam. It was the standard for entrance to university and to many forms of professional training. In 1988 both examinations . (to replace) by the more or less uniform General Certificate of Secondary Education.

The private sector ... (to be) running parallel to the state system of education. There are over 2500 fee-charging independent schools in Great Britain. Most private schools ... (to be) single-sex until the age of 16. More and more parents seem prepared ... ( to take) on the formidable extra cost of the education. The reason is the believe that social advantages ... (to gain) from attending a certain school. The most expansive day or boarding schools in Britain are exclusive public schools like Eton college for boys and St. James’ school for girls.

Task 4. Complete the sentences with prepositions below.

Under; before; in; for; on

1. Schooling is voluntary ... the age of 5 but there is some free nursery school education ... that age.

2. Primary education takes place ... infant schools ... pupils ages from 5 to 7 years.

3. Pupils ... comprehensive school take the examination called the Certificate of Secondary Education.

4. There are over 2500 fee-charging independent schools ... Great Britain.

5. More and more parents seem prepared to take ... the formidable extra cost of the education.

Task 5. Read the text put the verbs in brackets into the Passive Voice.

UNIVERSITIES AND COLLEGES IN GREAT BRITAIN

There are over 90 universities in Great Britain. They ... (to divide) into three types: the old universities (Oxford, Cambridge and Edinburgh Universities), in the 19th century universities, such as London and Manchester universities, and the new universities. Some years ago there were also polytechnics. After graduating from polytechnic a student got a degree, but it was not a university degree. 31 former polytechnics ... (to give) university status in 1992. The degree of Bachelor of Art or Science ... (to offer) to full courses of study.

Most degree courses at universities last three years, language courses 4 years (including year spent aboard). Medicine and dentistry courses are longer (5-7 years).

Students may receive grants from the Local Education Authority to help pay for books, accommodation, transport, and food. This grant depends on the income of their parents.

Most students live away from home, in flats of halls of residence. Students don’t usually have a job during term time because the lessons, which ... (to call) lectures, seminars, classes of tutorials, are full time. However, many students now have to work in the evenings.

University life (to consider) “an experience”. The exams are competitive but the social life and living away from home are also important. The social life is excellent with a lot of clubs, parties, concerts, bars.

There are not only universities in Britain but also colleges. Colleges offer courses in teacher training, courses in technology and some professions, which . (to connect) with medicine.

Task 6. Circle the letter of the best answer.

1. There are over [a) 100, b) 90, c) 50] universities in Great Britain.

2. They are divided into [a) three types, b) two types, c) five types].

3. Most language courses at universities last [a) four, b) three, c) two years].

4. Medicine and dentistry courses last [a) 3-4 years, b) 4-5 years, c) 5-7 years].

5. Students may receive [a) money, b) grants, c) books] from the Local Education Authority.

III. SUMMING UP

Speaking

Task 7. Answer the questions.

1. What three types of state school in Britain can you name?

2. What the most outstanding universities in Britain can you name?

3. Find at least three differences and three similarities between the system of education in Great Britain and Ukraine.

Home assignment

Make a chart of comparison of education in England and Ukraine.

Additional material to the topic "Educational system of Great Britain"

Task 8. Read the text. Agree or disagree the statements.

OXFORD

England is famous for its educational institutes. There were many different kinds of schools in Medieval England and the English universities were one of the most significant creations. The students who attended either Oxford or Cambridge Universities set an intellectual standard that contrasted markedly with the norm of Medieval England. Today both Universities are internationally renowned centres for teaching and research, attracting students and scholars from all over the world.

The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford is one of the oldest and most highly revered Universities in Europe. It was the first university established in Britain. Oxford is situated about 57 miles (90 km) north-west of London in its own county of Oxfordshire. The city lies at the confluence of the Rivers Cherwell and Thames, or “Isis”, as it is locally known, giving the opportunity to enjoy such pleasant pursuits as boating and punting, or a stroll along river banks. The story of Oxford is one of a war, plague, religious persecution, heroes and the emergence of one of the greatest Universities in the world. Known as the city of “Dreaming Spires”, Oxford is dominated by the Medieval architecture of the University, and the exquisite gardens within.

According to a legend Oxford University was founded by King Alfred the Great in 872 when he happened to meet some monks there and had a scholarly debate that lasted several days. A more realistic scenario is that it grew out of efforts begun by Alfred to encourage education and establish schools throughout his territory.

The first college, University College, was founded in 1249 by William of Durham. Other notable colleges include All Souls (founded in 1438), Christ Church (founded in 1546) and Lady Margaret Hall (founded in 1878), which was the first women’s college. Since 1974, all but one of Oxford’s colleges have changed their statutes to admit both men and women. St Hilda’s remains the only women’s college, and the rest enroll both men and women.

Today Oxford University is comprised of thirty-nine colleges and six permanent private halls, founded between 1249 and 1996, whose architectural grandeur, together with that of the University’s libraries and museums, gives the city its unique character. More than 130 nationalities are represented among a student population of over 18,000. There have been many famous people who have studied at Oxford University and they include John Locke, Adam Smith, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Lewis Carroll, Oscar Wilde, J. R. Tolkien, Indira Gandhi, Baroness Margaret Thatcher, Bill Clinton, Rupert Murdoch, Rowan Atkinson (Mr Bean), and Hugh Grant. All in all, Oxford has produced four British and at least eight foreign kings, 47 Nobel prize-winners, 25 British Prime Ministers, 28 foreign presidents and prime ministers, seven saints, 86 archbishops, 18 cardinals, and one pope. Seven of the last eleven British Prime Ministers have been Oxford graduates.

1. The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford is one of the modern and most highly revered Universities in Europe.

2. According to legend Oxford University was founded by King Alfred the Great in 872.

3. The first college, University College, was founded in 1549 by William of Durham.

4. Today Oxford University is comprised of fourty-nine colleges.

5. More than 130 nationalities are represented among a student population of over 18,000.

Task 9. Read the text and complete the sentences.

CAMBRIDGE

University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world (after Oxford). The start of the University is generally taken as 1209, when some masters and students arrived in Cambridge after fleeing from rioting in Oxford.

Cambridge is situated about 50 miles (80 km) north of London. The town of Cambridge originally took its name from the river on which it stood — the Granta. Through a convoluted process of evolution, the name “Grontabricc” became “Cambridge”, and the river became the “Cam”. The town is referred to in Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales as “Canterbridge”.

The university was basically established to study for religious purposes. The earliest teaching sessions of the University were carried out in churches or private houses. This was obviously unsatisfactory, and so the University authorities began to establish buildings for its own use. Some of these early “schools” still exist on the site known, appropriately, as the “Old Schools”. During the 14th and 15th centuries, the University gradually gained its independence from the church, with the Chancellor taking on both religious and civil duties.

Cambridge University is composed of more than thirty constituent colleges, one of the most illustrious of which is Emmanuel College. This college was founded in 1584 by Sir Walter Mildmay, Chancellor of the Exchequer to Queen Elizabeth I. Many Emmanuel graduates, including John Harvard, were among those who settled in New England in the first half of the 17th century. The oldest building is in St John’s College but the oldest college as institution is Peterhouse, dates from 1284. King Henry VIII founded the largest college, Trinity, in 1546.

The University at present has more than 16,500 full-time students — over 11,600 undergraduates and nearly 5,000 graduates. About 17 % of the student body is from overseas, coming from over 100 different countries. Because of its high academic reputation, admission to the University is highly competitive, and most overseas students already have a good degree from a university in their own country.

The list of illustrious alumni is endless. Among the most famous are Desiderius Erasmus, Francis Bacon, Christopher Marlowe, Lord Byron, Charles Darwin, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Jawaharlal Nehru, Vladimir Nabokov, Lee Kuan Yew (PM of Singapore from 1959 to 1990), and Rajiv Gandhi. The great Russian scientist Pavlov came to Cambridge to receive the degree of the Honorary Doctor of Cambridge. University of Cambridge is known as a great centre of science, where many famous scientists have worked.

1. The town of Cambridge originally took its name from the river on which it stood — ... .

2. The university was basically established to study for ... .

3. Cambridge University is composed of more than ... .

4. This college was founded in 1584 by ... .

5. Among the most famous are ... .





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